WW #27: Two Doses

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Here’s a Kharulian sentence to celebrate finally being fully vaxxed:

Sel faghióliamui niboghi tsaro anzaros.

[sɛɫ
s-el
INAN.SG-this
ɸaˈʝo.lʲa.mˠi
faghioli-am-ui
spirit-leaf-GEN
ɲiˈbo.ʝi
nibogh-i
small.cup-GEN
ˈtsa-ro
tsa-ro
two-ACC
an.zaˈrɔs]
anza-ros
3s.OBV>INAN.SG-need
You need two doses of this medicine.
Gloss provided by Gloss My Gloss

This sentence contains three new Kharulian words:

  • Faghióliam “medicinal plant, medicine” is from faghioli “plant spirit” + am “leaf”. The Kharulians believed that plants themselves were inanimate and that they grew and transformed under the influence of plant spirits. Certain plant spirits were friendly and would help heal a person who consumed a part of the host plant.
  • A nibui (genitive niboghi) was a small cup, usually made of wood. One of its uses was to administer medicines that had been ground up and mixed with water. This makes nibui a suitable translation of English “dose”.
  • Ros is a basic verb root meaning “to lack, to need”. It appears here with prefixes indicating a third-person obviative subject and an inanimate singular object. The third-person obviative is used as a generic pronoun, similar to English “generic you”; the sentence could also be translated as “One needs two doses of this medicine”, or “Two doses of this medicine are necessary”.

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